Friday October 24, 2014
Home Latest News News Precision Ag Technology Essential to Increase Globe's Crop Yield and Secure Food Availability
Precision Ag Technology Essential to Increase Globe's Crop Yield and Secure Food Availability

 

altA new globalised age has resulted in a higher standard of living, and a cornucopia of transnational  consumer choice, which has resulted in wider human consumption. The planet is under pressure as a result of this, due to  the nine billion population's mounting demand for fuel, food and crops. Predictions have been made that in order to meet this high elasticity of demand, production will double in the next two to three decades. 

The solution to this revelation is for farming production systems to be sharpened for the efficient use of resources. The resources themselves cannot be regenerated, as land athough is constant at best, is becoming increasingly overgrown and overused, whilst water resouces are running slim and nutrient supplies becoming more expensive. Through innovative and dynamic scientific advances in software and genetics, a new practice of Precision Farming can be implemented to help measure, monitor and allocate resouces for farming effectively. 

Precision Farming will be based on intricate notions of computer science. A web of interlocking networks between support centres on the farm and support centres in offices of suppliers and agronomic decision support centres are proposed. This symbiotic relationship between the farm and the nervecentre, will allow for communication on land management to be easily transmitted and applied instantaneously on specific site. Precision Farming also includes the adoption of GIS or GPS based databases, which document the outputs and inputs on each field to improve crop production.  GIS which stands for Geospatial Information Systems, will manage and store all forms of geographical information within a database, in this case with regards to agricultural farming. Whilst GPS, is a satellite navigation system that monitors and stores all information on weather conditions as long as their is an unobstructed line of sight that links to four or more GPS satellites. These databases are also for management decisions. 

Other plans include using software that can source and rate seeds, fertilizers and pesticides; which are then noted within the database. Additionally, Human Field Scouts (CCAs) will still be used, yet robotics, drones and digital cameras will make their work easier and more efficient. The use of drones, which capture rainfall and water levels to combat the problems of drought or pollution, can capture images, determine plant conditions and measure atmospheric gases. Impressively, drones can replicate the size of a hummingbird that can whiz around the field quickly and economically pick up information, or be nearly invisible. 

Moreover, larger more visible equipment, can include the use of a motor rotor helicopter that can overlook land across a wider stretch of space. Whilst any yeild monitor data collected in the databases can be used to document harvests and their variability. 

Precision Farming's endless possibilities can also incorporate nano technology that can help monitor weather and crop conditions, and help link up multiple farms between communicative networks to make statistical inferences and detect patterns or abnormalities across many areas. 

There is a real possibility to install projects such as the 'National Science Foundation Blue Waters System' at the University of Illinois. Blue Waters manages huge agricultural databases for future decisions.  Are we confident enough in making this largescale proposal a reality? Will we be willing to open up our data on our farms and share it? How much will precision farming contribute to global food security and crop yields? And will we one day be able to link up farm data with supercomputers to build global and national databases? 

The future of precision farming is of importance to agINFRA as it focuses on how computing and software can make innovative contributions to agriculture. 

For more information  please see here

 

Latest Tweets

Search

Latest News

17 September 2014, 11.13
agINFRA is doing our part to assist in the global movement for Open Agricultural Data by launching a new...
31 July 2014, 10.05
The eI4Africa and iMENTORS EU-funded projects are very pleased to invite you to their joint conference...
10 July 2014, 14.14
agINFRA was actively represented during the second in a series of seminars exploring ICT and Knowledge...

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Project Events

  • Events Calendar

    Last month October 2014 Next month
    M T W T F S S
    1 2 3 4 5
    6 7 8 9 10 11 12
    13 14 15 16 17 18 19
    20 21 22 23 24 25 26
    27 28 29 30 31

Tag Cloud


Advisory Board

Kris Jack

Jack

Kris Jack is a senior data mining engineer at Mendeley. He holds a PhD in Computer Science and has worked on data systems in academia and industry for the past 10 years. He was invited to give keynote presentations on recommender systems for scientific articles at the I-KNOW 2011 and RecSysTEL 2010 conferences. He also presently sits on the Editorial AdvisoryBoard for the Journal of Open Research Software.

Alexander van Opstal

Alexander van Opstal

Alexander van Opstal has a Master of Science in Ecology, Soil science and Philosophy of Science. He is an experienced senior policy advisor, leading projects and programmes in the field of programming of research for policy. Alexander is also a member of the ERA-ARD-EIARD-SCAR-Taskforce on Agricultural Research for Development. He has been part of the Dutch delegation to the annual meeting of the UNESCO World Heritage Committee for four years. He is chair of the European branch of the Dutch Scientific Landscape Ecological Society. He has been councilor to the Municipality of Rhenen for two years.

Dave Roberts

Dave Roberts

Dave Roberts is head of the division of Microbiology in London's Natural History Museum. He has a long-standing interest in biodiversity informatics, having introduced the Scratchpads in the EU project EDIT, where he was a work package leader, and is currently project manager for the EU project ViBRANT, seeking to make the Scratchpad mantra 'small pieces loosely joined' a reality.

Erik Duval

Erik Duval

Erik Duval chairs the research unit on human-computer interaction, at the computer science department of the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven.

His research focuses on massive hyper-personalization (“The Snowflake Effect”), learning analytics, openness and abundance - topics on which I regularly keynote. In practical terms, we research information visualization, mobile information devices, multi-touch displays and personal informatics. We typically apply our results to technology enhanced learning, access to music and ‘research 2.0′.

Wouter Los

Wouter Los

Dr Wouter Los is currently Project Leader of LifeWatch, the proposed e-science and technology infrastructure for biodiversity research. By training a theoretical chemist, he has held positions at the Universities of Leiden and Amsterdam, as well as being Director of the Institute for Taxonomic Biology. He has also held positions as Chair and Vice-Chair within a number of committees, including the Science Committee of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Society for the Management of European Biodiversity Data.

Peter Ballantyne

Peter Ballantyne

Peter began his career working with agricultural information - first at the World Bank, then at a Faculty of Agriculture in Thailand, then in the CGIAR at the International Service for National Agricultural Research (ISNAR); he spent the past 15 years working in the international development sector, with the European Centre for Development Policy Management (ECDPM), the International Institute for Communication and Development (IICD), and the International Network for the Availability of Scientific Publications (INASP).

Dickson Lukose

Dickson Lukose

Dr. Dickson Lukose is the Head of the Knowledge Technology Cluster at MIMOS BHD. Dr Lukose is also the director of the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory as well as the Centre of Excellence in Semantic Technologies. Prior to MIMOS BHD, Dr Lukose worked extensively in Artificial Intelligence Technology, developing software applications in the areas of Risk Management and Knowledge Management. He has done over 10 years of academic research in Artificial Intelligence, supported by research grants from Graphic Directions, Leverhulme Foundation, CSIRO, and Australian Research Council.

Carole Goble

Carole Goble

Carole has worked closely with life scientists for many years and is the Director of the myGrid project, the largest UK e-Science pilot , which has produced the widely-used Taverna open source software. She is also the co-director of the e-Science North West. She has an international reputation in the Semantic Web, e-Science and Grid communities and has led the application of Semantic Web technologies to both the Grid and e-Science, a fusion dubbed the Semantic Grid.

Stefano Cozzini

Stefano Cozzini

Stephano Cozzini is a development scientist at INFM (Italian National Institute for Matter Physics) working at National Simulation Center DEMOCRITOS hosted at Sissa (Trieste, Italy). He is presently coordinating all the IT activities within the center and works an external consultant for cluster and grid computing at ICTP (International Center of Theoretical Physics). His main professional interests are in the fields of high-performance computing and grid computing appliced to computational physics.

Samy Gaiji

Samy Gaiji

Samy Gaiji is currently Senior Programme Officer for Science and Scientific Liaison at Global Biodiversity Information Facility. He has extensive experience in delivering agriculture infrastructures for major entities such as the IPGRI, the Convention on Biological Diversity and FAO.

agINFRA Banner

* Right click on the image above and select 'Save Image As...' to get the agINFRA banner for your website/blog!